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Old 01-04-2008, 09:06 PM
gabi gabi is offline
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Default no internet, no wireless printer
Hi, I cannot connect to the internet or print to my wireless printer.

I just installed PC-BSD 1.4 on a Dell Inspiron 2200 that has an externall wireless card, a Belkin f5d7010 (Ralink chipset). Everything seems to work fine. PC-BSD recognizes this card and when I am trying to connect to the Internet, my Motorola router shows up among the available wireless networks as expected. But that's about it. I can't connect to the internet. My wireless network is WEP/WPA encrypted. I gave PC-BSD the network key under the WPA Personal button in the Wireless Configuration tab. In the General tab, I have the DHCP box checked.

PC-BSD can't find my wireless printer, a Brother HL-5280DW, either. I guess I have one wireless networking problem with two effects, but I have no idea how to make it go away. I looked in the knowledge base to no avail.

I would appreciate any help with this.
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Old 01-05-2008, 12:00 AM
Oko Oko is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
Originally Posted by gabi
Hi, I cannot connect to the internet or print to my wireless printer.

I just installed PC-BSD 1.4 on a Dell Inspiron 2200 that has an externall wireless card, a Belkin f5d7010 (Ralink chipset). Everything seems to work fine. PC-BSD recognizes this card and when I am trying to connect to the Internet, my Motorola router shows up among the available wireless networks as expected. But that's about it. I can't connect to the internet. My wireless network is WEP/WPA encrypted. I gave PC-BSD the network key under the WPA Personal button in the Wireless Configuration tab. In the General tab, I have the DHCP box checked.

PC-BSD can't find my wireless printer, a Brother HL-5280DW, either. I guess I have one wireless networking problem with two effects, but I have no idea how to make it go away. I looked in the knowledge base to no avail.

I would appreciate any help with this.
How does your /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf file looks like? You have to edit with something like

network={
ssid="The name of your network"
psk="Your password"
}


That assuming that everything else is OK i.e. that your /boot/loader.conf file is properly edited as


wlan_wep_load="YES"
wlan_ccmp_load="YES"
wlan_tkip_load="YES"

and that your /etc/rc.conf file is properly edited with

ifconfig_ral0="WPA DHCP"


Then reboot and you should have wireless.



Speaking of printer the problem is that despite the fact that it is on the same network
it must be listed as a trusted host. Now if you were using native LPD spooling system you would list IP address of the printer in the file /etc/hosts.lpd
as

192.168.X.X (whatever is the local address of the printer)

Of course /etc/printcap file has to be properly edited for network printing and lpd daemon has to be on.

Now PC-BSD unfortunately uses CUPS so you have to edit the file

/usr/local/etc/cups/cupsd.conf

and to list the IP address of your printer.

Then go to http://localhost:631 and use wizard to add the printer.


BUT there is a big BUT. Your printer seems rather new and I personally could not find it in the data base of

http://www.linux-foundation.org/en/OpenPrinting

I didn't make a mistake Unix and Linux printing are identical.

I however suspect that that printer can speak Post Script language (all high end Brother printers do) and that printer doesn't need any drivers and PPD files. That thing should work directly.


On my vanilla FreeBSD box where I use lpd daemon I would directly edit /etc/printcap file and that thing should work without a problems.

You need however to pass all files to a2ps filter or to edit printcap file appropriately.


For the short theoretical explanation of Unix printing look this post.


Originally Posted by oko
Printing is the same in *BSD and Linux so this is all the information you need to know

http://www.linux-foundation.org/en/OpenPrinting

It will help you if you understand Unix printing. Essentially it goes something like this

application -> filter (a2ps or CUPS-base) -> file is now in post script language-> spooling system (LPD or CUPS) -> (if the printer does not speak Post Script Language
one uses PPD to be able to describe to driver how to describe graphics to printer) -> driver (GhoastScript or Gutenprint or HPLIP) which speaks Printer Command Language-> printer


Most deskjet printers are cheap peaces of crap that not only do not speak Post Script Language but they do not speak Printer Command Language. Those are Win printers and
will not work with Unix. Good desktop printer will speak Printer Command Language and best choice are those supported by HPLIP (unless you mind binary blobs like me when you have to chose something from Ghoastscript list (just type gs -h to see it) or Gutenprint)
Most serious people do not like to get PPD description files from Linux web-site but rather
create them using foomantic-rip.


Best solution by far is to buy a printer see above link that speaks Post Script Language.

Then you do not need any drivers, PPD files, or any other nonsense to print. Moreover
best way to print on vanilla FreeBSD, OpenBSD, or NetBSD (except PC-BSD and DesktopBSD)
is to turn on LPD (line printer daemon) and just edit manually /etc/printcap file
Look /usr/share/examples for an example.
You can use apsfilter first time to priduce a tamplate and until you get more skilled to edit printcap file. Network printing is trivial as well.


Printing from some application might be problematic as they use CUPS-base filter to convert files to Post Script. CUPS-base is not very good filter as a matter of fact CUPS is way too complicated way of printing if you really want to be in control.

Better way is just saving your file and passing it manually through a2ps or describing
this step in your printcap file and letting LPD to the step for you.
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Old 01-05-2008, 12:14 AM
Oko Oko is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
I forgot to say that I do not know your PF settings. You might need to change your PF rules to be able to use the printer even to administer printer.

For instance my PF makes http://localhost:631 unusable but the printer still works.

The above is the simplest possible set up assuming that your PF is off.
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Old 01-05-2008, 01:33 AM
gabi gabi is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
OK, I'm pretty lost, but there is hope. I am new to Unix (as new as my PC-BSD installation), so bear with me.

I opened /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf in KEdit and it looks like this:
network={
ssid="motorola"
psk="a very long stream of numbers and letters"
}

I know how this happened. "motorola" showed up in my available wireless networks list in the General tab of the Wireless Configuration box that showed up after on the Devices tab in the KDE Control Module I selected ral0, then I hit 'Configure'. Judging by the signal strength of over 100%, I reasoned it could only be my router, so I selected it and I then I very hopefully hit 'Connect.'

The psk comes from the same dialog box. Years ago, when I bought that router, I had a world of trouble getting it to work. After hours with the tech support I evidently managed to set up a wireless network consisting of that router and my laptop. I then got an e-mail with the network settings, where among other things there was this Network Key of numerous letters and numbers. I saved it and I had my house guests use it every time they had to go online with laptops they brought along. It always worked for them, so that's what I entered under the WPA Personal radio button on the Security tab of the Wireless Configuration dialog box. It doesn't work here, though. The ral0 device still shows up under a slashed red circle.

So what I'm saying is that I know how to get to these unix system files, and I would be willing to edit them as needed, but (1) I have no idea what to put in and (2) whatever I do put in, KEdit refuses to let me save over. How do you make changes to these .conf files?

Gabi

Originally Posted by Oko

How does your /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf file looks like? You have to edit with something like

network={
ssid="The name of your network"
psk="Your password"
}


That assuming that everything else is OK i.e. that your /boot/loader.conf file is properly edited as


wlan_wep_load="YES"
wlan_ccmp_load="YES"
wlan_tkip_load="YES"

and that your /etc/rc.conf file is properly edited with

ifconfig_ral0="WPA DHCP"


Then reboot and you should have wireless.



Speaking of printer the problem is that despite the fact that it is on the same network
it must be listed as a trusted host. Now if you were using native LPD spooling system you would list IP address of the printer in the file /etc/hosts.lpd
as

192.168.X.X (whatever is the local address of the printer)

Of course /etc/printcap file has to be properly edited for network printing and lpd daemon has to be on.

Now PC-BSD unfortunately uses CUPS so you have to edit the file

/usr/local/etc/cups/cupsd.conf

and to list the IP address of your printer.

Then go to http://localhost:631 and use wizard to add the printer.


BUT there is a big BUT. Your printer seems rather new and I personally could not find it in the data base of

http://www.linux-foundation.org/en/OpenPrinting

I didn't make a mistake Unix and Linux printing are identical.

I however suspect that that printer can speak Post Script language (all high end Brother printers do) and that printer doesn't need any drivers and PPD files. That thing should work directly.


On my vanilla FreeBSD box where I use lpd daemon I would directly edit /etc/printcap file and that thing should work without a problems.

You need however to pass all files to a2ps filter or to edit printcap file appropriately.


For the short theoretical explanation of Unix printing look this post.


Originally Posted by oko
Printing is the same in *BSD and Linux so this is all the information you need to know

http://www.linux-foundation.org/en/OpenPrinting

It will help you if you understand Unix printing. Essentially it goes something like this

application -> filter (a2ps or CUPS-base) -> file is now in post script language-> spooling system (LPD or CUPS) -> (if the printer does not speak Post Script Language
one uses PPD to be able to describe to driver how to describe graphics to printer) -> driver (GhoastScript or Gutenprint or HPLIP) which speaks Printer Command Language-> printer


Most deskjet printers are cheap peaces of crap that not only do not speak Post Script Language but they do not speak Printer Command Language. Those are Win printers and
will not work with Unix. Good desktop printer will speak Printer Command Language and best choice are those supported by HPLIP (unless you mind binary blobs like me when you have to chose something from Ghoastscript list (just type gs -h to see it) or Gutenprint)
Most serious people do not like to get PPD description files from Linux web-site but rather
create them using foomantic-rip.


Best solution by far is to buy a printer see above link that speaks Post Script Language.

Then you do not need any drivers, PPD files, or any other nonsense to print. Moreover
best way to print on vanilla FreeBSD, OpenBSD, or NetBSD (except PC-BSD and DesktopBSD)
is to turn on LPD (line printer daemon) and just edit manually /etc/printcap file
Look /usr/share/examples for an example.
You can use apsfilter first time to priduce a tamplate and until you get more skilled to edit printcap file. Network printing is trivial as well.


Printing from some application might be problematic as they use CUPS-base filter to convert files to Post Script. CUPS-base is not very good filter as a matter of fact CUPS is way too complicated way of printing if you really want to be in control.

Better way is just saving your file and passing it manually through a2ps or describing
this step in your printcap file and letting LPD to the step for you.
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Old 01-05-2008, 01:46 AM
gabi gabi is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
Partial success: I now know how to edit the .conf files, using Konqueror as root (Start->System->More Applications->File Manager - Super User Mode). Learned it from an old post here. So, that's nice.
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Old 01-05-2008, 02:27 AM
Oko Oko is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
Originally Posted by gabi
Partial success: I now know how to edit the .conf files, using Konqueror as root (Start->System->More Applications->File Manager - Super User Mode). Learned it from an old post here. So, that's nice.

Forget idiotic GUI. Open the shell. Type

$su -
$password type your supper user password
#cd /etc
#ee fileneme.conf


This is the lecture 0 in Unix. From now on you will have to continue without my help.
This might help

http://8help.osu.edu/wks/unix_course/

http://8help.osu.edu/wks/sysadm_course/


Speaking of your local networking and router set up you will have to learn the things or to pay somebody $50 per hour to set up it for you.

This is a good start

http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO885 ... ation.html

http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq6.html
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Old 01-05-2008, 02:44 AM
gabi gabi is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
OK, I'm making progress faster than I can report it. I did give up on the GUI. I now work from the Konsole like the pros, and of course kedit will save whatever I want as long as it recognizes me as the su.

However, still no luck with either my internet or my printer. PC-BSD is recognizing an internal Intel Ethernet card (calls it fxp0 and it also lists it under if_fxp_load in the /boot/defaults/loader.conf) and the external Belkin PCMCIA card (calls it ral0 after Ralink, but doesn't list it in the /boot/defaults/loader.conf file). Still, it refuses to use either. I have no idea how to change that. I guess I'll go learn Unix at OSU. If all else fails, I still have the Windows XP install CD.

Thank you for your time, OKO.

Best,
Gabi
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Old 01-05-2008, 03:01 AM
Oko Oko is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
Originally Posted by gabi
OK, I'm making progress faster than I can report it. I did give up on the GUI. I now work from the Konsole like the pros, and of course kedit will save whatever I want as long as it recognizes me as the su.

However, still no luck with either my internet or my printer. PC-BSD is recognizing an internal Intel Ethernet card (calls it fxp0 and it also lists it under if_fxp_load in the /boot/defaults/loader.conf) and the external Belkin PCMCIA card (calls it ral0 after Ralink, but doesn't list it in the /boot/defaults/loader.conf file). Still, it refuses to use either. I have no idea how to change that. I guess I'll go learn Unix at OSU. If all else fails, I still have the Windows XP install CD.

Thank you for your time, OKO.

Best,
Gabi
Read manual pages for

man ifconfig, man dhclient, man wpa_supplicant

You also didn't mention that you have pc_card but I guess it is already enabled

/etc/rc.conf

pccard_enable="YES"

You will also have to play with the file

/etc/pccard_ether


Probably at this point you realize that GUI is actually an obstruction to getting things
working properly and that the easiest thing is to install your own VanillaFreeBSD and
start configuring services and things that you need. As you go along you will learn things and you will also be in complete control of your computer unlike now in the case of your printer.

You also can use your own window manager which could greatly improve the speed and responsiveness of your system

I like to use Openbox, xfce4-panell and set background with feh.
My favourite file manager is ROX


Best of Luck
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Old 01-05-2008, 03:03 PM
TerryP TerryP is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
In case you have not seen it any where, viewing is ok but never edit the default/* files because for example what ever is not in the main file will be set from the default/file.


The ral driver is compiled into the kernel so you don't need it physically loaded from loader.conf (without the driver the kernel probably wouldn't call the card ral0).


One perk of PC-BSD is if you like KDE, you don't have to take the time to set it up yourself hehe.



PS: I think I'll take a look at feh, I usually use xv and kview.
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Old 01-05-2008, 06:23 PM
gabi gabi is offline
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Default Re: no internet, no wireless printer
Thank you for the tip. I heeded the original authors' advice, in the comment lines at the beginning of default/loader.conf and I didn't mess with it.

But now I have a new problem. In the process of trying to understand my wireless network I managed to wreck it.

I got a Motorola router on factory settings. I also have a wireless printer that is connected to the router with an ethernet cable. The router is set to Open System/WEP 128 encryption.

There are three laptops in this house. All used to run Win XP. They all used to recognize the router and go online or print without a hitch. I never felt any need to link all these five devices into a proper WLAN.

In the process of getting PC-BSD on the oldest of the three laptops, I thought I'd set also up a WLAN. Result: I managed to screw up the internet and printer access of all my computers except the newest one (also a Win XP).
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