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Old 07-25-2005, 09:18 PM
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Default log-in as root in KDE
Hi all,
how would one log-in as root in KDE. i keep getting a message that loging in as root is not allowed. i can log in as a super user as a regualr user via the console.

Thanks for the help,
qa1433 - Paul 8)
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Old 07-25-2005, 09:23 PM
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Solarin Solarin is offline
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Hi Paul,

Unsure of the method to do this in KDE.

However, you shouldn't need to log in as root at all, if you want to run something as root within kde you can either:

1) KMenu -> Run Command...

Type 'kdesu' followed by the program you want to run, for example:

Code:
kdesu ark
2) Right click on the item you want to run as root in the KMenu and select 'Edit Item'

Place a cross in the 'Run as a different user' box, and type 'root' into the 'Username' textbox that becomes enabled.
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Old 07-25-2005, 09:33 PM
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Thanks Solarin,
That seems to work. I am from the linux world and I am used to login as root @ KDE's login promped. i was surprized when i could not login as root under FreeBSD.
paul 8)
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Old 07-27-2005, 12:01 AM
StolenNomenclature StolenNomenclature is offline
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Default use the GUI as root
Can anyone tell me how to enable a root login within KDE? e.g. the original question of this post, not how to use the command line instead.

I do not want to use the command line. I want to use the GUI.

Please DO NOT reply how to do things via the command line. Not interested in command lines. Thats why I use a GUI, cause I dont like command lines.

If I seem to be hammering the GUI issue, its because everythime I see this question asked, someone always offers the CLI method instead.

BY the way, I wish that a root login were a standard feature. Its almost impossible to do anything with a 'nix system without root permissions, so a GUI without a root login is next to useless for anything other than a program launcher or for sending emails.

Many thanks.
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Old 07-27-2005, 05:15 AM
sblevin sblevin is offline
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StolenNomenclature: Loging in as root is suicide and I'm not sure we ever WILL get the option.

There IS however many ways to run graphical apps as root user when you need to do admin work.

Here is one.

If you plan to do a lot of work as root: Open the start menu at, KDE Programs, System, More Applications, and right click on the icon "File Manager - Super User - Mode" and select to add it to your Desktop or main panel.

Double clicking your new icon will open a root password confirmation box, and then start Konqeror up in file management mode as root.

Now when you "double click" or" right click and "Open With" a file from root konq it will also open as root. KDE should take care of the permissions to open under X as a different user.

I use a different theme from Root User, so it's easy NOT to get a root konq mixed up.
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Old 07-27-2005, 10:02 AM
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Default Re: use the GUI as root
Originally Posted by StolenNomenclature
BY the way, I wish that a root login were a standard feature. Its almost impossible to do anything with a 'nix system without root permissions, so a GUI without a root login is next to useless for anything other than a program launcher or for sending emails.
Ok, actually the only thing you *really* need to be root for is system configuration, and once you've got your system setup, how often are you going to change it? If you use the KDE control centre then you just need to press 'administrator mode'. Admittedly some poorly coded programs demand root when they don't need it, but for the most part you can get along fine as a regular user.

Running your everyday applications as root is a foolhardy procedure for any machine connected to a network (especially the internet) and is actually one of the primary reasons people have so many security problems in windows. Most people run everthing as 'Administrator'.

Not running as root means that even if you system does get compromised, only so much damage can be done since the user that is compromised won't have access to everything. This is the same reason for running network 'daemons' as their own users.

Anyway, the point is, you don't *need* a KDE root session, you just think you do. If you always want to run a particular program as root then right click it in the KMenu and select 'Edit' Item. Then prefix the command with 'kdesu'.
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Old 07-28-2005, 11:28 AM
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Default Re: use the GUI as root
Originally Posted by Solarin
Originally Posted by StolenNomenclature
BY the way, I wish that a root login were a standard feature. Its almost impossible to do anything with a 'nix system without root permissions, so a GUI without a root login is next to useless for anything other than a program launcher or for sending emails.
Ok, actually the only thing you *really* need to be root for is system configuration, and once you've got your system setup, how often are you going to change it? If you use the KDE control centre then you just need to press 'administrator mode'. Admittedly some poorly coded programs demand root when they don't need it, but for the most part you can get along fine as a regular user.

Running your everyday applications as root is a foolhardy procedure for any machine connected to a network (especially the internet) and is actually one of the primary reasons people have so many security problems in windows. Most people run everthing as 'Administrator'.

Not running as root means that even if you system does get compromised, only so much damage can be done since the user that is compromised won't have access to everything. This is the same reason for running network 'daemons' as their own users.

Anyway, the point is, you don't *need* a KDE root session, you just think you do. If you always want to run a particular program as root then right click it in the KMenu and select 'Edit' Item. Then prefix the command with 'kdesu'.
I want to install an application that is in the form of a .run file. I double click on it in Konquerer and it begins to run. Then it comes up with an option to select an install directory, default is /usr/games/<etc>. I say yes, go ahead. It comes up with "you dont have permission to access this etc.etc".

Far from rarely having to log in as root, I find you can hardly do anything on a 'nix system unless I am, besides running already installed programs.

Installing programs is a regular occurence for me. Also, ever tried to edit a configuration file (such as the X86Config for X) from Konquerer - same deal.

With out root access, the whole system is read only, like I'm running it from a CD-ROM.

I understand your comments about configuration, but the ideal of spending a few days setting up a system, and then from then on just using it, is a dream.

Real systems are like old cars - you spend as much time underneath then with a spanner as you do driving them.
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Old 07-29-2005, 11:51 AM
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Unfortunately this is an argument that can never be 'won', there are views both for and against the 'running as root' scenario. I think the point that the 'anti-root' people overlook is that some people have no problems with running as root, it is their choice and that choice should not under any circumstances be abitrarily removed because it does not sit well with someone else.

The biggest problem that a user can face is the loss of his personal data and not the system. If his system is compromised as a user he loses his data, if its compromised as root he loses system and personal data, frankly can't see too much difference there. The system can be reinstalled in 15mins the data can never be recovered.

It is I guess a little like one of my other pet peeves, I don't like being told that I Must use at least 4 characters for a password, I should be the judge of what I use, nobody else.

These points are obviously made with reference to Home computers systems and not a Server type installation where security is of course paramount, but my view is that if I 'cockup' then I am to blame and I'll fix it - but it is after all My Computer

Ray
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Old 07-29-2005, 02:46 PM
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Wowsers, you can reinstall an entire system in 15 minutes! :shock:

Takes me up to 3 hours to reinstall the OS (depends on the OS), install all the applications and drivers I need and to restore my personal data from the last backup. I must be slow ops:

Also, a lot of home users share their machines with the rest of the family. In this environment running as root isn't just risking *your* data, it's risking the data belonging to everyone else as well as trashing the system.

As for 'the data can never be recovered', well... it depends if you take the time to back your data up. As someone who lost all their data due to HD failure 5 years ago, I have religious backup policies. I would advise anyone to backup their documents weekly at the very least. But depending on your facilities it can be a bit of a pain.

I agree about passwords though, frankly if it's a workstation the only password that matters is root, unless you have sensitive information on your account of course. I'd even go as far to say that you probably don't need a password at all on such a machine. :shock:

But yes, it is your computer and if you want to be able to screw it up you're perfectly entitled to. Such measures are just put in place to try and stop people from doing it accidently.

On a side note, in my experiece quite often many of the people who complain about poor computer security, and ask why their system is riddled with spyware are the same ones who demand to be able to turn off security and run as root. There are of course always exceptions, I've seen said machines running just fine and as clean as a whistle. Depends on the level of experience the user has.
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Old 07-29-2005, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Solarin
Wowsers, you can reinstall an entire system in 15 minutes! :shock:

Takes me up to 3 hours to reinstall the OS (depends on the OS), install all the applications and drivers I need and to restore my personal data from the last backup. I must be slow ops:

Also, a lot of home users share their machines with the rest of the family. In this environment running as root isn't just risking *your* data, it's risking the data belonging to everyone else as well as trashing the system.

As for 'the data can never be recovered', well... it depends if you take the time to back your data up. As someone who lost all their data due to HD failure 5 years ago, I have religious backup policies. I would advise anyone to backup their documents weekly at the very least. But depending on your facilities it can be a bit of a pain.

I agree about passwords though, frankly if it's a workstation the only password that matters is root, unless you have sensitive information on your account of course. I'd even go as far to say that you probably don't need a password at all on such a machine. :shock:

But yes, it is your computer and if you want to be able to screw it up you're perfectly entitled to. Such measures are just put in place to try and stop people from doing it accidently.

On a side note, in my experiece quite often many of the people who complain about poor computer security, and ask why their system is riddled with spyware are the same ones who demand to be able to turn off security and run as root. There are of course always exceptions, I've seen said machines running just fine and as clean as a whistle. Depends on the level of experience the user has.
A little misunderstanding I think - my 15 minute install was the Operating system eg PCBSD, Linux or whatever. Takes me much longer than 3 hours just to reinstall a Windows Operating system. Installing everything else, well I guess you've had to do it yourself so you have a good idea of the time involved.

Home users, well I have only one, myself, I have 4 computers and they are all strictly mine, nobody else uses them.

Backups I do them regularly, however Murphy's law would state that your hard drive or your system will crash or be compromised at a time which will cause you the greatest amount of grief, ie i hour before your scheduled backup.

I do agree that 'some people' can be a real 'pita' about what happens when they want security but turn it off because it's a nuisance and then complain that 'spyware' etc has invaded their computer (Windows), but that should never preclude a user like myself from running as root. I suppose you could say that because some people are dangerous drivers over 50mph (some people are dangerous as soon as they get in a car) that everybody should drive at or below 50mph, that's not a logical resolution and neither is the non root situation in all situations. It should be a choice, you either login as root or you login as a user, it doesn't seem like a real big deal to me. However I'll get by with whatever I have to do to keep my computers running.


I am pleased however to have someone support my 'password' peeves.

Ray
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