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Old 07-06-2006, 11:00 AM
gelex gelex is offline
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Default How to create a SLICE?
I've been trying to setup a multiboot system with the ff: OS order 1.Windows XP 2.Kubuntu 3.Mandriva 4.Fedora 5.PCBSD 1.11 6.PCBSD 1.2 Beta. I'm thru setting up the first four but I'm having problem with PCBSD since it grabs the remaining free space as a single slice. Partitioning only creates partitions within the 1.11 slice, not a slice for 1.2 Beta. I want to create another slice for 1.2 Beta. The PCBSD partitioner doesn't seem to handle that. How to create a slice?
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Old 07-07-2006, 01:36 AM
fuzzybud fuzzybud is offline
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You have to give more detail for anyone to help you. What partition does each OS occupy? I am too new to pcbsd to know if it can be installed to an extended partition. If not, if it is like FreeBSD, it must be installed to a primary partition. A partition in Linux terms is the same as a slice in BSD terms.
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Old 07-07-2006, 02:14 AM
dracheflieger dracheflieger is offline
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It's no differenet than FreeBSD fuzzybud...and I'm pretty sure you are right, it can't be mounted to an extended partition.
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Old 07-07-2006, 03:29 AM
TerryP TerryP is offline
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I know PC/Free BSD can mount ufs, fat32, ext2, ext3, (read only) reiserfs, and (read only) ntfs partitions.

PC/FreeBSD must be installed into a primary partition, the only OS that I know of that can fit it's buttocks into a DOS Extended Partition would be newer Windows (so I've heard.).

PCBSD/FreeBSD does support logical drives/extended partitions.

The extended partition is one slice, the logical drives each slice after.

ad0s4
ad0s5
ad0s6
ad0s7
e.t.c.

If for some odd reason PCBSD can't auto detect the logical drives you'll have to add them manually to /etc/fstab.
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Old 07-07-2006, 04:36 AM
gelex gelex is offline
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I couldn't install two pcbsd's on the same hard drive. That was my initial problem. Furthermore I couIdn't install PCBSD on top of the list next to Windows as it grabs all remaining free space as its own in one slice, even if you create a root partition with less than the free space within that slice. When this happens Linuxes see the slice as unknown and there's no more room for Linuxes. Thus, I eventually settled with PCBSD 1.11 as the last 20 GB of my 80GB first hard drive hda (i'm using Linux naming convention here) and the 1.2 beta on 15GB 2nd hard drive hdb.

Here's what I've done
1. Created a 20 GB primary partition in Windows installer (hda1).
2. Created a 1 GB primary partition as linux-swap in Kubuntu installer(hda2).
3. Created all free space as extended partition in Kubuntu installer(hda3).
4. From the extended partition, created a 15 GB Kubuntu logical root partition(hda5).
5. Created 10 GB logical root partition in Mandriva installer(hda6).
6. Created 10 Gb logical root partition in Fedora installer(hda7).
7. Installed PCBSD 1.11 and it automatically created 19GB root and 1GB swap as primary partitions from the remaining free space(hda4).
8. Installed PCBSD 1.2 beta in the 15GB 2nd HD(hdb1).

All Linuxes are in the extended partition as can be seen in GAG as colored blue (black is primary). And they all use the 1GB linux-swap. My 80 GB HD is actually just 76GB in the eyes of partitioning software. I can live with this setup.
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Old 07-07-2006, 08:24 AM
fuzzybud fuzzybud is offline
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Default Partitioning
I too am new to the BSDs. For three years I have been learning Linux, various distros, and rarely did I install FreeBSD and NetBSD for a day or so at a time. I even installed two early releases of PC-BSD for a day or so. Now I am ready to stay with the BSDs.

I had to say that so you know that I am not an expert making pronouncements from on high. The way you describe your hard drive partitions confuses me, especially when you say you put pcbsd on hda4.

My understanding of MBR is that there is room only to put the beginng and ending address of four partitions, primary partitions, nothing else. That is a legacy from the old days. Now with the need for more partitions a scheme was made to put the addresses of the extended, logical partitions in primary partition 4 (hda4). That is why when a person creates partitions they make hda1, hda2, hda3 with no problems. At that point the user has to decide how many more partitions are needed, if only one more partition is needed it becomes hda4, still no problem. But because there are now four primary partitions no more partitions can be created.

Lets say that the user wanted to make five or six more partitions. Then partition hda4 has to be declared an extended partition. So hda4 is given room, physical space on the hard drive, to write logical partitions, as many as 63, I think is the limit. Now hda4 is no longer available for the user's partitions because the space in hda4 is used for the addresses of the logical partitions to be defined. That is why the numbering you see skip from hda3 to hda5. Hda4 has taken all the space not defined by hda1, 2, and 3 and is waiting to create the addresses for the logical partitions. I know that any of the primary partitions can be declared an extended partition but for clarity I presented it the way I did.

Now this user has made partitions hda1, hda2, hda3, hda5, hda6, hda7, and hda8, all nicely laid out.

Windows OS we know needs to be installed in hda1. OpenBSD wants root to be in the first 8 GB of the hard drive. FreeBSD and the other BSDs are to be installed in primary partitions (I have seen a couple references saying that NetBSD can be installed to an extended partition, but I don't know that to be true.) Linux can be installed to extended, logical partitions, no problem.

With those parameters in mind I make hda1, hda2, and hda3 for the BSDs. To avoid confusion I am using the term partition when we all know that in BSD talk they are a slice with partitions inside a slice. Because Linux is happy existing in logical partitions I put Linux out there. I always make hda5 the swap partition on all of my computers so I know where it is. Hda6 and hda7 will be / and /home for whatever version of Linux I favor at the moment, usually Mepis, but not always. The remaining logical partitions will be temporary home to various distros for a day, a week, even a month.

For a bootloader I use GAG as you do. I have used GRUB and lilo enough to know how they work, but I prefer to use GAG.

The way you described the layout of your hard drive sounded so strange I thought I would describe the way I layout my hard drives.
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Old 07-07-2006, 08:33 AM
fuzzybud fuzzybud is offline
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Default I forgot to say
I forgot to say that I have been using pcbsd 1.11 on hda3 since I downloaded it last week. Hda1, and hda2 were unused. You said you could not get pcbsd 1.11 and pcbsd 1.2beta to exist on the same hard drive. I had never tried to install two versions of FreeBSD on the same hard drive so didn't know if it were possible or not. For that reason tonight just before writing this and the other one I installed pcbsd 1.2beta on hda2 with success. I am writing this from pcbsd 1.2beta. The two versions of pcbsd seem to work fine on the same hard drive.
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Old 07-07-2006, 08:36 AM
antik antik is offline
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Default Re: I forgot to say
Originally Posted by fuzzybud
I forgot to say that I have been using pcbsd 1.11 on hda3 since I downloaded it last week. Hda1, and hda2 were unused. You said you could not get pcbsd 1.11 and pcbsd 1.2beta to exist on the same hard drive. I had never tried to install two versions of FreeBSD on the same hard drive so didn't know if it were possible or not. For that reason tonight just before writing this and the other one I installed pcbsd 1.2beta on hda2 with success. I am writing this from pcbsd 1.2beta. The two versions of pcbsd seem to work fine on the same hard drive.
Please name freebsd specific partitions with their respective names:
Code:
hda1 = ad0s1
hda4 = ad0s4
etc.
FreeBSD can use 4 primary partitions and lots of slices within. More information found here.
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Old 07-07-2006, 08:54 AM
fuzzybud fuzzybud is offline
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You are correct. I wrote from the view point of a Linux user. I am very new to BSD so that is the reason for my lapse in using the proper terms. I will do better in the future.
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Old 07-13-2006, 07:35 AM
PCdoc PCdoc is offline
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Default A Solution
Yeah, I see what you mean with the installer automatically filling the whole space, but I got arround it (that custom disklabel option didn't let me make it smaller as a whole, it formatted it before I could change anything, and the changes appear to be internal slices of the primary pie).

Keep in mind that I know nothing about bsd or linux. I had never even heard of ufs2 until today, but I am am rather handy with Ranish Partition Manager . I've been seaching everywhere for the last month for a product like this and I love it so much I signed up here just to answer your question and do my part.

Anywho, first off, without doing some fancy stuff that you end up regretting later, you can only have 4 primary partitions per drive. From what I think I read, you've got xp,swap,extended,pcbsd,pcbsd... that's 5, you need to get that swap into the extended first.

Then either using ranish (which is like a nuclear sub without a manual) or windows xp, just go and create a partition of any type half the size of that 20 gb space, reboot and install pcbsd1.2 in the left over space, then install pcbsd1.11 over top of the spacer partition, then go to that website and read about XOSL boot manager, you're gonna need it

The partition thingy in xp can be got to by right clicking on my computer, choosing manage, then clicking on disk management, and right clicking on the graphic of what you want to mess with.
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