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  #61  
Old 05-08-2012, 05:11 PM
Weixiong Weixiong is offline
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I started a new job in '93 where they had a Apple and gave me my own floppy disk like I knew what I was doing. I had never touched a computer before, but wasn't about to let them know it and taught myself to use it in my spare time. When they upgraded to an Apple II I was the only one who knew how to boot it up, as you had to flip the floppy during boot.

From there I went to Windows 98, Mandrake Linux, XP, Tao Linux, PC-BSD, Vista, then back to PC-BSD and FreeBSD. I finally got rid of Windows altogether this year and now only use PC-BSD, FreeBSD and pfSense machines.

I do have a Commodore 64C I'm dieing to learn to use but am missing the cord that goes to the TV and haven't been able to come up with a S-Video cable to fit it yet.
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  #62  
Old 05-08-2012, 05:20 PM
Tiberius Duval Tiberius Duval is offline
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S-video cable?, As far as I remember standard rf-cable fitted to C-64, and from it to tv. At least in European version. We used my friends old C64 couple of years ago for little retro gaming weekend, and used normal rf-cable.
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  #63  
Old 05-08-2012, 06:10 PM
Weixiong Weixiong is offline
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I used the RF cable from my Nintendo Entertainment System for a while but it didn't work too well and I don't have it anymore.

I checked out a vintage computer forum Ole Jool told me about where they talked about using an S-Video cable to connect to the TV for a better picture, and it does have the outlet for one, but it's larger than the standard S-Video cable they sell at WalMart.

I see they've got whole Commodore 64 systems for sale pretty cheap on e-bay but I don't use credit cards so that cuts me out of buying a lot of cool stuff...

I don't have any of the peripherals that go with it to play any games but I do have the Learning to program in Basic 2.0 System Guide it came with. I installed one of the .pbi C64 emulators available through AppCafe and messed with it for a while but that's not the same as using the console.

Last edited by Weixiong; 05-08-2012 at 06:37 PM.
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  #64  
Old 05-08-2012, 07:25 PM
Tiberius Duval Tiberius Duval is offline
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It seems that c-64 does not use standard adapter in its end of s-video cable, you need either make your own or buy some used cable. That is quite common feature in 80's era home computers, make some own standards for peripheral equipment to force users buy only from manufacturer. Sadly it does not make things easier for old computer enthusiasts .
This is somewhat interesting link about that: http://radagast.bglug.ca/C64_svideo/C64_Svideo.html
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  #65  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:43 PM
Weixiong Weixiong is offline
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Thanks for the link, here's the article I was talking about:

how-to-connect-a-commodore-64-to-a-television

If it involves any soldering I'd be better off using an RF cable.
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  #66  
Old 07-04-2012, 05:06 AM
makimoto makimoto is offline
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Well, started with an MSX with some sort of DOS and basic. (at this old age is not easy to remember those details... ). Anyway, with PCs began with a 286 with DOS of course, and after went with various incarnations of windows. At some point I realized, I wanted a home server, and began with slackware cds that came with a book or something (yggdrasil??). That was '94/95 I think. From then, Debian, mandrake, (os/2 was there somewhere. It was good, pity the lack of apps), always alongside some version of windows. With WinXP I grew tired of the ongoing malware war. Constantly having to update this or the other... And I ditched it in favor of Kubuntu 6 or something. Since, k/x/lubuntus (but no gnome) have populated the desktop and mostly debian the server. Along the way tried many others but forgotten which ones. Haiku has a special place in my heart, but it's still too alpha to be usable (but blazingly fast!). Have had to work with Solaris, HP-UX, rhel...

Until I fell in love with FreeBSD.
OpenBSD, I "discovered" few months after that.

The stability, the no frills attitude, reminds me very much of slackware. Wonderful. Relaxing...

At some point noticed pc-bsd, and now 9.0 is installed on the desktop.
Not perfect, but I can wait for the new intel video drivers. Vesa works acceptably. The camera does not work on skype, but it's not something I would use anyway...
Stable. Very happy indeed with it.
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  #67  
Old 07-04-2012, 01:06 PM
drulavigne drulavigne is offline
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Just a note that the camera issue was fixed and should work with the 2.1.0.81 version of the PBI.
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  #68  
Old 07-05-2012, 06:18 PM
zer0sig zer0sig is offline
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My first real computer experience was when I was 7 as my mom took a computer course at the local community college and my dad brought home an Apple //c - she didn't get into it very much but I sure did. First things I did after dinking around with some of the software we had, I got into BASIC programming. Now, this was right around the time WarGames came out, so my first actual program was a login/security system that at first was just something like:

10 PRINT "LOGIN:"
20 GET A$
30 IF A$ = "USERNAME" THEN GOTO 60
40 PRINT "INVALID USERNAME!"
50 END
60 PRINT "WELCOME TO THE SYSTEM"
70 (something other than ending)
I set it to autoboot this and learned to trap break keys in time. Over the next several years I became fairly proficient in a few other forms of basic like VIC-20 Commodore BASIC and HP's Rocky Mountain BASIC, writing what at the time seemed like pretty serious stuff, pieces of software that never were officially released for those platforms.

I rather fell off of programming as I went through my teens, though I was quite into BBSes and the like and wrote my share of batch files in MS-DOS as I migrated to PCs. I guess I've always been interested in different OS types, and that led me to learning about Solaris on a local free-access server in 1995, just after graduating high school. Got into an early version of Slackware at about the same time, which was convenient as I started learning Bourne programming and basic userland stuff. It was Solaris 4.1 so it was still BSD-based but I couldn't get but so in depth anyway and the scripts were simple - I learned much more at home on the Linux box.

I ended up favoring Debian after the Solaris system was shut down for good, and by that time had learned a fair amount of rudimentary usage and security info (I was always interested in the subject, from collecting and studying viruses on DOS/Win based systems, writing a couple for proof-of-concept on obsolete BASIC interpreted OSes, working for McAfee briefly, and learning about the current holes in Unix systems at the time), but really learned to run a production system in a kind of trial-by-fire: the PC shop I worked for in 1998 wanted to start an ISP, and I was basically the SME for servers and Unix, so I ended up doing most of the ISP from scratch, sharing duties on the router and terminal server, but the big cheese for DNS, SMTP, NNTP, HTTP, etc. We had a nice shiny new multiprocessor tower for running NT4 and IIS and an NNTP server, and various older spare parts for the Unix DNS/HTTP/SMTP/FTP/etc machines. After some deliberation, I decided to try FreeBSD on the servers, as I thought the packagehandling and overall CLI administration were more straightforward than in the various Linux distros I had tried. That was my saving grace as the cleaner dependencies and the easy ability to CVS and compile the basic userland and kernel left me free to learn without the hassle of trying to constantly battle with the packaging/by hand maintenance of Linux.

Fast forward to now - I have been a sysadmin or IT/telecom contractor for much of my adult life, and have worked with some pretty serious mission-critical servers for some large corporations. I still prefer FreeBSD, and when I set up what I'm using right now, PC-BSD was a little less finicky about X.Org setup, certain devices on my notebook, and had ZFS+crypt setup when FreeBSD did not. I am slowly mutating the system closer to a stock FreeBSD setup, as I prefer working on configs/monitoring/etc in a CLI and using a more barebones GUI (XFCE4) - still trying to figure out the best way to do certain things, like upgrading flash from ports/packages today rather than using the probably simpler PBI setups. Still need to upgrade Firefox as I'm running one of the 3.x releases. Anyway, I love Unix in all forms and I really dig PC-BSD for desktop work and often recommend it to novice users. I hope to contribute here as time goes along.
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  #69  
Old 07-05-2012, 09:56 PM
mwatkins mwatkins is offline
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My first experience with a computer as a TRS-80; at school a year later we had access to some HP paperweight with 4K RAM, a cassette drive, a punch card reader, and a 1-line display. Editing on that was, er, challenging.

In the 1980's somehow I ended up working in the IT industry, first at a major software house and later working for a big iron Unix vendor which doesn't exist anymore. Over the past 15 years I've been doing systems integration consulting work and web application development, mostly behind corporate firewalls.

I use FreeBSD on all my public and private servers and until recently was using it for my development desktop but have been using Linux, with regrets, on the workstation and laptop. Working ACPI / suspend and resume are important to me these days, even on a desktop.

I've got on two drives on this machine a by-hand installed FreeBSD / Xorg / XFCE environment going which does fine but has issues with suspend/resume.

On a second pair of drives I've loaded up a default latest snapshot of PC-BSD to see how it fares. Suspend seems to be working but resume loses the mouse, something of an improvement from my other boot machine.

KDE is too heavy for me but on this machine (i7, 16GB RAM, fast drives) it runs acceptably well. I'd prefer Gnome 2 if I wanted a full out environment, but I don't, so I prefer XFCE when I want some windowing environment and most days I boot up in dwm because I dislike moving my mouse when writing code and like how dwm fits my brain.

I don't like running Linux with desktop environments because I don't understand it as well as FreeBSD (which I tune by hand) so by the same extension PC BSD feels a little foreign to me too, but at least I am familiar with what is under the covers. Probably going to nuke this install and go with the lighter weight XFCE flavour right now...

By the way, I love the idea of a desktop BSD and hope to see more momentum behind it.

Last edited by mwatkins; 07-05-2012 at 09:59 PM.
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  #70  
Old 08-17-2012, 03:50 PM
john_rambo john_rambo is offline
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Kubuntu > Fedora > Ubuntu > opensuse > LMDE > PCLINUXOS > PCBSD

Thats my journey.
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