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Old 08-15-2010, 02:45 PM
warp5 warp5 is offline
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Default Unable to set correct time
After using 8.0 in English I Installed 8.1 in Dutch.
Now I don't get the permit to change time; as root I can update software. What's going on?

Sjors
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Old 08-15-2010, 03:35 PM
Ralph_Ellis Ralph_Ellis is offline
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This is a known issue with KDE4 not PC-BSD. Check to see if ntpd is installed by typing as root
ntpd
in a terminal. If you do not get an error message then ntp is installed and it will update your date and time. Ntp installation was an option when you installed PC-BSD.
If nptd is not installed then as root in a terminal, type
pkg_add -r ntp
Then you will have to find and edit the ntp.conf file to point it to the appropriate time server.
You can also change date and time manually. Open up a terminal and as root type
sysinstall
In the Post Install Configuration options, you should find a menu item to change date, time and time zone.
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Old 08-22-2010, 04:47 PM
warp5 warp5 is offline
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Can't check in as root and time setting via menu is forbidden.
Installed again in English but still the same problem.
Spent a lot of time and will go back to Linux; works better for me.

Sjors
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Old 08-23-2010, 01:11 AM
Ralph_Ellis Ralph_Ellis is offline
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Actually this is more a KDE4 issue. Some Linux distributions have institued a fix for this issue and some have not. In the end, if you installed the ntpd daemon and edited the ntp.conf file or selected synchonize time with ntp servers during the install, it is a none issue. You system will adjust the time automatically.
If this is a key issue with you, you might take a look at OpenSuse or Ubuntu or a system that lets you log in as root to do this change.
Good luck.
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Old 08-23-2010, 01:29 PM
warp5 warp5 is offline
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Thanks Ralph for your time,

I still can't be root. Why and what do I have to do exactly.
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Old 08-23-2010, 09:52 PM
Ralph_Ellis Ralph_Ellis is offline
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Open up a terminal,
type
su
then type your
root password.
type
pkg_add -r ntp

Find out where the ntp.conf file is by typing
whereis ntp.conf. Usually it is in /etc
type
nano /etc/ntp.conf

In the sample ntp.conf file, edit out the # in front of the
server pool.ntp.org
line.
Save the file by hitting
Control X and Enter.
That should do it if ntp is not already set up.


See also
http://www.freebsd.org/doc/handbook/network-ntp.html
or
http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/freebs...tp-server.html

For instructions in Dutch, go to a Dutch search engine page and type in
ntp freebsd
That should get you instructions in Dutch.
Good luck



# Sample /etc/ntp.conf: Configuration file for ntpd.
#
# Undisciplined Local Clock. This is a fake driver intended for backup
# and when no outside source of synchronized time is available. The
# default stratum is usually 3, but in this case we elect to use stratum
# 0. Since the server line does not have the prefer keyword, this driver
# is never used for synchronization, unless no other other
# synchronization source is available. In case the local host is
# controlled by some external source, such as an external oscillator or
# another protocol, the prefer keyword would cause the local host to
# disregard all other synchronization sources, unless the kernel
# modifications are in use and declare an unsynchronized condition.
#
server 127.127.1.0 # local clock
fudge 127.127.1.0 stratum 10
server pool.ntp.org

#
# Drift file. Put this in a directory which the daemon can write to.
# No symbolic links allowed, either, since the daemon updates the file
# by creating a temporary in the same directory and then rename()'ing
# it to the file.
#
driftfile /etc/ntp/drift
multicastclient # listen on default 224.0.1.1
broadcastdelay 0.008

#
# Keys file. If you want to diddle your server at run time, make a
# keys file (mode 600 for sure) and define the key number to be
# used for making requests.
# PLEASE DO NOT USE THE DEFAULT VALUES HERE. Pick your own, or remote
# systems might be able to reset your clock at will.
#
#keys /etc/ntp/keys
#trustedkey 65535
#requestkey 65535
#controlkey 65535

# Don't serve time or stats to anyone else by default (more secure)
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Old 08-24-2010, 08:15 PM
Fatmice Fatmice is offline
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ntp should already be installed. Change time via sysinstall.
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  #8  
Old 09-14-2010, 12:40 PM
warp5 warp5 is offline
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Thanks,

sysinstall did it!
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