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  #21  
Old 08-14-2011, 09:22 AM
DarkPhoenix DarkPhoenix is offline
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I'll bite.

As a mostly Windows guy who enjoys some Linux and a little Mac I was scared off of the name Unix and anything to do with it directly - Linux was a chore to learn (still learning), Mac a little easier, more Windows like.

I come from a long line of personal computers; Tandy Radio Shack Color Computer, Tandy models 1 - 4, Timex Sinclair , Texas Instruments Ti-99, Vic 20, Commodore 64, Atari 400, 800 and 1600 - Then the PC's came on the scene and it was a whole other ballgame. After DOS held my attention for a few years and Windows 3.1 came out I swore I'd never again touch another command prompt if I really didn't have to.

Now, with everything becoming standardized in a way with all graphical interfaces and similar structure (desktop environments) anyone can find their way around in any of our modern systems. All the windows, start buttons, file managers all have common elements that lend to ease of use and recognize-ability. Even MS Windows users can install and use KDE.

I think a new OS with a new name might be more exciting to some people if it is not associated with a system that is known. I see people looking at Linux distros and saying, " oh that's just another Linux distro", and they turn away. Thus some people may be turned off by BSD and it's association with Unix. I know I certainly never would have tried PCBSD If I had followed my first thoughts. I'm a tinkerer so I took the time to investigate it because it had promise of an easy to use desktop environment and that's what I was looking for. I'm glad I second guessed myself - I was afraid there would be so much "Unix" in it that I wouldn't be able to stand it.

Windows has spoiled people by keeping the internal operations of the OS under the hood locked away and providing them with a good user interface. That's what most desktop users look for in an OS I think.

Perhaps PCBSD could do a test market and release a copy of say Isotope (alone side of their regular release) with a new brand dropping the BSD and heavily advertise with no mention of BSD under the hood, just to see how many takers they can get. Emphasize not that it's BSD or Unix based but all the ease of use features, common popular programs people want and of course the eye candy and see where that takes the OS.

We all have opinions but we need hard data on what works best. Unless you do a test market, you will only be guessing and if you don't the devs may always wonder what might have been. Try something different, think out the box. It couldn't hurt and only cause you to design a better product.

Last edited by DarkPhoenix; 08-14-2011 at 09:25 AM.
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  #22  
Old 08-14-2011, 09:35 AM
Thulemanden Thulemanden is offline
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MeeGo is a powerful rebrand of a Linux and the user see no 'Linux' name anywhere.

If you want to go that way, how about 'Frames' or Open Frames'

The current headlines says ' The PC is dying out'. In that case it is not useful to use 'PC' in the name making people believe it is not suited for laptops or notebooks.

I know they can be called personal computer, but PC is still mostly used for stationary machines of some size.

Using the X from iXsystems could be a hit, so why not X-frames to use for cross-over, meaning it is suited for many types of machines and gadgets (or will be)

(frames to tells it is windows-based without stepping on Microsofts toes.)
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Last edited by Thulemanden; 08-14-2011 at 10:18 AM.
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  #23  
Old 08-14-2011, 09:51 AM
Abdul Abdul is offline
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Personally I was looking for an OS with good ZFS support that would be as easy to set up and learn as possible and the name PC-BSD was good. It's likely that without BSD in it, I wouldn't even find it so I don't think dropping it would be good.
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  #24  
Old 08-14-2011, 11:15 AM
DarkPhoenix DarkPhoenix is offline
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Originally Posted by Abdul View Post
Personally I was looking for an OS with good ZFS support that would be as easy to set up and learn as possible and the name PC-BSD was good. It's likely that without BSD in it, I wouldn't even find it so I don't think dropping it would be good.
I agree. The PC in the name was one thing that caused me to check out PCBSD. I was looking for PC desktop friendly in my searches. Thulemanden's comments are valid as well. That's why I say release the exact same OS say, Isotope at the same time two different ways. One under PCBSD and another with rebranding. This way you appeal to both sides of the fence.

It should not be too hard or take too long to go into the OS and simply change all the references to PCBSD and replace them with something else, aside from technical manuals/help files, those would take the longest.
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  #25  
Old 09-08-2011, 07:28 AM
errandonea errandonea is offline
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PC-BSD is, de facto, the desktop edition of FreeBSD. And there is already a large cooperation between PC-BSD and FreeBSD developpers. I think both projects would benefit if they were merged and if PC-BSD was simply called "FreeBSD, desktop edition". Current FreeBSD would become "FreeBSD, server edition".

I guess there must be some good reason not to act that way, or it would already have been done, but what is this reason ?
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  #26  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:40 PM
ideq105 ideq105 is offline
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Default Beware copyright and trademark
The system log says that FreeBSD is running and FreeBSD is a registered trademark. I suppose this could hinder any well-intentioned attempts at branding.

May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 newsyslog[1439]: logfile first created
Quote:
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 syslogd: kernel boot file is /boot/kernel/kernel
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: Copyright (c) 1992-2011 The FreeBSD Project.
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: Copyright (c) 1979, 1980, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: FreeBSD is a registered trademark of The FreeBSD Foundation.
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE #3: Tue Dec 27 21:59:00 UTC 2011
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: root@build9x64.pcbsd.org:/usr/obj/builds/i386/pcbsd-build90/fbsd-source/9.0/sys/GENERIC i386
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: CPU: Intel(R) Atom(TM) CPU 330 @ 1.60GHz (1600.03-MHz 686-class CPU)
May 5 20:15:06 pcbsd-874 kernel: Origin = "GenuineIntel" Id = 0x106c2 Family = 6 Model = 1c Stepping = 2
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  #27  
Old 05-07-2012, 09:04 AM
Ole Juul Ole Juul is offline
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Originally Posted by errandonea View Post
PC-BSD is, de facto, the desktop edition of FreeBSD. And there is already a large cooperation between PC-BSD and FreeBSD developpers. I think both projects would benefit if they were merged and if PC-BSD was simply called "FreeBSD, desktop edition". Current FreeBSD would become "FreeBSD, server edition".

I guess there must be some good reason not to act that way, or it would already have been done, but what is this reason ?

Of course I can't speak for other people or communities, but in my view FreeBSD has quite a different philosophy than PC-BSD. FreeBSD users also use GUI's on occasion (especially for desktop use) but generally wish to control their own systems to a higher degree.

If you look at the FreeBSD forum, I think you will see that it is quite a professional approach. PC-BSD on the other hand, is a way to bring the value of BSD to many more people who don't aspire to the same level of understanding of the OS. (And likely don't want to spend as much time.) What PC-BSD is doing is a great thing - just not for FreeBSD users.
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  #28  
Old 05-08-2012, 12:57 AM
Tigersharke Tigersharke is offline
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I don't have an issue with the name, but a coherent/managed/controlled message about the OS wouldn't hurt. If you were to do an image search for the various PC-BSD logos: the dash version of pre-v9.0, the arrow version of v9.0, the fireball, the combo fireball dash, or the combo arrow fireball; you will discover many disparate websites with varying levels of helpfulness and quality.

I feel there needs to be some accountability for use of these logos especially within the context of each site's purpose. Yes we do have official sites and information, but they get diluted by every other site out there. Each conflicting message or inaccurate bit of information causes confusion and troubles for our users and potential users.

I am not against a fandom or enthusiast webpages, but it does seem reasonable that there could be some type of fact-checking or oversight which would merely seek to maintain accuracy and coherency of documentation and message where applicable.

As for PC-BSD becoming a well-known brand or super popular OS.. I think this will happen organically- with every person who has to answer the "what is that?" or "How can I get that?" question, it gains momentum. When our users are active in the process of development, support, documentation, or other aspects in addition to being consumers of the OS, it will more rapidly improve. These are simply truths. Even since v8.2's transition to v9.0, you may have noticed the increased buzz and involvement of various people. Very few if anyone at all, will want to try something where the website is outdated, forums languish without posts, mailing lists haven't had posts in months or years, dedicated irc channels sit silent all day nearly every day. People seek support and a feeling that the project big or small is still active, still vital.

A suggestion to anyone, would be to read about tasks looking for people, or how to support PC-BSD. In reality it only takes two things to be involved: interest/passion and motivation. All I can do is attempt to spark those.

Last edited by Tigersharke; 05-08-2012 at 01:00 AM. Reason: punctuation
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  #29  
Old 05-08-2012, 01:26 AM
Tigersharke Tigersharke is offline
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Originally Posted by DarkPhoenix View Post
Now, with everything becoming standardized in a way with all graphical interfaces and similar structure (desktop environments) anyone can find their way around in any of our modern systems. All the windows, start buttons, file managers all have common elements that lend to ease of use and recognize-ability. Even MS Windows users can install and use KDE.

I think a new OS with a new name might be more exciting to some people if it is not associated with a system that is known. I see people looking at Linux distros and saying, " oh that's just another Linux distro", and they turn away. Thus some people may be turned off by BSD and it's association with Unix. I know I certainly never would have tried PCBSD If I had followed my first thoughts. I'm a tinkerer so I took the time to investigate it because it had promise of an easy to use desktop environment and that's what I was looking for. I'm glad I second guessed myself - I was afraid there would be so much "Unix" in it that I wouldn't be able to stand it.

Windows has spoiled people by keeping the internal operations of the OS under the hood locked away and providing them with a good user interface. That's what most desktop users look for in an OS I think.
I agree in general.

Firstly, it might be bad prior experiences which cause anyone to avoid something with Linux (or BSD) in the name. In addition to this, the idea of time and effort spent on obtaining and installing something that is already tainted by the unknown or bad feelings prevents many from knowing how much an OS would fit their needs.

* Any event which would by its nature allow prospective users to try and to experience the OS before any effort is spent on an install, could help to convince those seated on the fence. Hamfests and other tech events, even computer parts [surplus] sales events where a booth to promote and allow access to try software could be rented.

* It would certainly be possible to create videos that show and tell of PC-BSD without any mention of the OS name or variant until the very end. It might even be possible to hide/obscure other mentions/symbols that would give it away.

* As a user-driven concept, anyone could create a "How I use my PC-BSD" or "What I do with PC-BSD" and similar videos along the same idea as the rather annoying "I am a PC" advertisements of Microsoft.
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  #30  
Old 08-17-2012, 07:04 PM
jwele jwele is offline
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I find PC-BSD to be very similar to ASUS. I find acronyms to be more successful. OSX for instance.
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