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Old 03-10-2011, 02:34 PM
Skull Fire Skull Fire is offline
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Default Partitions and Slices
Do NOT add, edit, delete, or create primary partitions with PC-BSD
Yes, the tools are there to do it, but install failure rate and boot failure rate are high if you do. Create your 1-4 primary partitions using something else, then install PC-BSD totally inside 1 primary partition. You install all your mount points inside 1 primary partition.

This is not only a PC-BSD problem, many distros have issues with editing primary partitions.

In my opinion the biggest problem with installing pc-bsd is in setting partitions(primary partitions) and slices(mount points that are installed as something like a logical partition). Its really 2 problems i think:

Problem 1 has to do with the terminology used for partitions and slices which lead to confusion and poor installs because many new users dont know yet. Problem 2 is the pc-bsd installer is not good at editing or adding actual primary partitions.

I wrote extensively about problem 1 here in "Installer Developement":
http://forums.pcbsd.org/showthread.php?t=14170
Basically the installer shows primary partitions as "slices". And maybe leads users to think slices are partitions also.

Note* my wording of partitions and slices conflicts with what you will read on the installer.
For my purposes we will call primary partitions as "partitions". Partitions are the 1-4 primary partition that hard drives can have.

We will call the mount points (/boot, / , /var, /home and so on) as "slices". Slices are something like logical partitions that you install inside of 1 primary partition. You can install all slices inside of one partition, including /boot and swap. if fact i recommend it as it is more efficent use of your partitions. Also disk encryption works with /boot on a seperate slice, but still on the same partition, just be sure never to encrypt /boot.

Problem 2: as stated in the begining of the guide( it needs repeating ! ):
Do NOT add, edit, delete, or create primary partitions with PC-BSD

Use another utility or another os to create your partition first. If you have a known way to do that, thats great. If you are not sure i have 2 suggestions (plus you can google):

Windows partition manager works very well at creating primary partitions. If you have windows installed on the same pc as the hard drive you intend to install PC-BSD to, then its quite simple:
start button > control panel > administrative tools > computer management > storage.

Once you are on the storage page you have options to shrink, add, delete and so on. just click on the bar graph of the freespace or partiton you want to change, then click "all tasks" to see the available options to create, edit, delete. . .
It will install the ntfs file system by default, but that does not matter, as any os you install on that partition later will overwrite the ntfs with its own file system.

aptosid linux's live dvd is dead useful, not just for partitioning, but other things, which i'll get to in other guides.

Four reason's i suggest it for partitioning: 1.Its a light weight dvd and boots to desktop as a live dvd faster than any distro iv found. 2. You dont need to install aptosid to your hard drive for the partitioning tool to work. Partitons are fully created before aptosid writes its install to disk. 3. aptosid seems to work on all hardware old and new, as per my testing anyway.
4. The partitions always work. The only problem i have encountered is if i "apply" more than 1 partition change at once. I found it best to fully "apply" 1 partion, so that it is 100% complete, then apply another, if i need to.

To use it: run the aptosid live dvd to desktop. click the install icon. click the partition tab. click the "execute" button. Click the hard drive you want to edit. click the partition/freespace you want to edit. click add, delete, create or whatever. set the size you want, and you can set the file system though this doesn't matter as you will overwrite the file system later. click ok. click apply.

when the screen tells you "100% completed successfully" you're done. close it all out, restart. This usually takes totally 5-10 minutes totally. Put your PC-BSD install disk in. Install pc-bsd to 1 primary partition.

Note* The "execute" button is triggering the KDE partition manager on the live dvd.

you can find the aptosid mirror links here:

http://aptosid.com/index.php?module=...unc=view&pid=2

KDE The KDE partition manager works great if you use KDE on another os on the same computer. For best results fully apply 1 partition change at time. to find it: start button > system > KDE partition manager

Installing Slices:
Again i am saying "slices" are the mount points that work as something like a logical partition inside of a primary partition.

You will never see slices while looking at your partitions from another os, you will only see the single partition.

If you choose the automatic setup i believe it will install the slices automatically to a partition you choose.

I recommend creating them yourself. This way you know exactly what was there if there is any problems. also you are installing in a way you prefer.

To do this: Click "customize disk partitions" on the "disk" page of the installer. Now on the new page you can only add/edit slices. you can not add/edit actual partitions on this page, which is good. To add slices click the green "+" symbal. A new window will appear. From the drop down box select the partition you want this slice to go into. choose file system, size, and mount point. click ok when you are finished. Many slices can be added to 1 partition. You will see the "available mb" of the partition get lower after each slice is added.

Feel free to test and install anyway you like, but for a higher success rate of install and boot/login rate success, i recommend the following:

1. Install PC-BSD to totally 1 primary partition (the partition created elsewhere)


2. Use one of the options below as your mount point (slice) setup:

In the options below, we will guess you are using a partition with 100gb. Regardless of your actual partition size, always install /boot on a 500mb slice using ufs.

Note** always install a 500mb /boot and use ufs file system only, or the installation or start up will probably fail. Always install the swap slice as the last slice, or your install may fail.

Option 1: (1)100gb partition
500mb /boot ufs (only this !!) do not encrypt /boot
97.5gb / , /var , /usr , /home zfs (with zfs you can add all 4 mount points to this single slice) encrypt or not, both work well
2gb swap do not encrypt swap

Option 2: (1)100gb partition
500mb /boot ufs (only this !!) do not encrypt /boot
97.5gb / ufs+s (encrypt or not, both work well)
2gb swap do not encrypt swap

Option 3: (1)100gb partition
500mb /boot ufs (only this !!) do not encrypt /boot
12gb / ufs+s do not encrypt
10gb /var ufs+s do not encrypt
75.5gb /usr ufs+s (encrypt or not, both work well)
2gb swap do not encrypt swap

Of course you can choose your own options, but use a 500mb /boot ufs and always install swap last (atleast until some changes/bug fixxes are made). also i would not encrypt more than 1 slice, 2 reasons. 1st its a pain to enter more than pw for disk encryption during start up. and 2nd, encrypting a 2nd slice has has mixxed install results combined with 2nd pw not working (as of this writing).

If you install all of PC-BSD to 1 partition no one can casually enter that partition if 1 slice is encrypted anyway:
http://forums.pcbsd.org/showthread.php?t=14266

Last edited by Galraedia; 09-04-2011 at 02:56 PM.
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Old 07-02-2011, 04:47 PM
Skull Fire Skull Fire is offline
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I plan to do some testing in the near future with 9.0 and will edit the above for any changes.
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Old 08-15-2011, 09:43 PM
skorlowsky skorlowsky is offline
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Cool Quick Question on Partition size.
Quick Question on Partition size.
----------------------------------------------

Hello, I have been using Linux for more than 15 years, many diferent distros, based on .rpm and/or .deb. to not mention all the different distros.

I have no problems whatsoever creating partitions on Linux, but I am lost in the Unix world, I tried FreeBSD long long time ago, and tried Solaris as well, but I need orientation on partitioning a HDD to be used for PC-BSD.

In Linux I use:

/ (20 GB) main
The Swap partition (2 - 4GB) (I have 2 Gb in RAM)
/home all the rest of the space. (136GB) Aprox. (all my stuff)

The Size of the HDD for the FreeBSD is 160 GB.

What size partitions would you recommend for a "Clean" Installation of PC-BSD and how many slices and its sizes, if you decide to help me on this.

I am a fast learner, but right now, I am lost!

I had the software do all the partitioning, and its running fine, have no problems. but I see some slices too small. and most everything goes in /usr
I have left about 113 GB of free space after installing of all the packages I use. (well, most of them.)

The System is a COMPAQ Presario.

Dual Core, E-2220 2.4 Ghz. (I Replaced the original CPU - E2140)
2 Gb in RAM, Video Card: Nvidia GeForce 9500 GT.

1.- HDD with 400 GB (Windows 7)
2.- HDD PC-BSD (160 GB) FreeBSD.
3.- External WD-HDD 1- Tera-byte. (My-Book) Western Digital 1TB.
4.- CDROM/DVD (LightScribe)

Have a nice day!

Sergio Korlowsky
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Old 08-18-2011, 09:13 AM
DarkPhoenix DarkPhoenix is offline
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For Windows 7 users you can get a free partition manager called Partition Wizard. This is what I used to partition my hard drive. I have a laptop with one hard drive and needed to resize my windows partition to make a new partition for PCBSD. Windows cannot resize the drive volume with it's built in tool while the volume is in use. This is why I choose Partition Wizard over Windows Partition Manager.

I am using Isotope and did not have to manually create any slices for swap files etc, the Isotope installer does that by default.

There are two free versions on the download page you may want. One is the Home Edition which runs in Windows and the other is the Bootable CD of the Home Edition, I recommend the Bootable CD of the Home Edition.

Website: http://www.partitionwizard.com/

Download: http://www.partitionwizard.com/download.html


By default Windows 7 will use all of your hard drive for installation. I choose to install a fresh Windows installation then use the bootable Home Edition CD to resize my hard drive down giving me 50 gigabytes of unallocated space left over. I created a new primary partition with this unallocated space to install PCBSD to.

Remember when installing PCBSD do NOT check the Use Entire Disk box and make sure you select the new partition you created, other wise you will overwrite your Windows 7 installation.

You can use an easy free tool like EasyBCD to set up your Dual Boot if you like. EasyBCD is free for personal use. http://neosmart.net/dl.php?id=1

Last edited by DarkPhoenix; 08-18-2011 at 09:24 AM.
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Old 08-25-2011, 05:15 PM
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Galraedia Galraedia is offline
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I've moved this thread to the Installing PC-BSD section of the forums because I believe that a person experiencing any of these problems is most likely to look there first. I also added to the thread's title to show that these problems are present in PC-BSD 9.0 and do not effect past versions of PC-BSD.
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Old 08-27-2011, 01:42 AM
Skull Fire Skull Fire is offline
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damn iv been jacked ! and i cant even edit my own title to fix your edit.

i actually wrote this guide for 8.1 and the current official release 8.2. though the fundamentals should apply to 9.0 also, i have not made any edits in regards to 9.0 yet.

if you're going to keep this thread here i wish someone would sticky it so it dont slip off into oblivion, as new users seem to have the same install issues fairly often.
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Old 09-04-2011, 03:12 PM
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Galraedia Galraedia is offline
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Originally Posted by Skull Fire View Post
damn iv been jacked ! and i cant even edit my own title to fix your edit.

i actually wrote this guide for 8.1 and the current official release 8.2. though the fundamentals should apply to 9.0 also, i have not made any edits in regards to 9.0 yet.

if you're going to keep this thread here i wish someone would sticky it so it dont slip off into oblivion, as new users seem to have the same install issues fairly often.

I apologize for that. I've re-edited the thread to it's original title and have made it stick so that it will remain viewable at the top of this forum's section. Also, you can still change the title but keep in mind that you will have to click the [Go Advance] button to do so.
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Old 11-29-2011, 10:22 AM
manumart1 manumart1 is offline
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Devices - Slices - Partitions
Hello, I am newbie at FreeBSD and have a question about terminology (devices, slices, partitions).

Quote:
PC-BSD 9 Handbook [2011.11.29]
4.3 Using a Custom Partition Layout
...
NOTE: For the UFS filesystem, PC-BSD uses the same disk terminology as FreeBSD, which is different than the terminology used by Windows or Linux. In FreeBSD, the portion of the disk the operating system is installed into is called a "partition". That partition is then sliced up into "slices", with each slice containing a filesystem and a mount point.
Quote:
FreeBSD Handbook [2011.11.29]
4.5 Disk Organization
...
File systems are contained in partitions. This does not have the same meaning as the common usage of the term partition (for example, MS-DOS partition), because of FreeBSD's UNIX heritage. Each partition is identified by a letter from a through to h. Each partition can contain only one file system...
...
Each partition-that-contains-a-file-system is stored in what FreeBSD calls a slice. Slice is FreeBSD's term for what the common call partitions, and again, this is because of FreeBSD's UNIX background. Slices are numbered, starting at 1, through to 4.
...
Example: "ad0s1a" is The first partition (a) on the first slice (s1) on the first IDE disk (ad0).

From "FreeBSD Handbook" I understand that a device (a hard disk) is divided into slices (Windows and Linux people call them partitions), and an slice is futher divided into partitions (specific FreeBSD partitions).

But "PC-BSD 9 Handbook" says another thing. It says that a partition is sliced up into slices, and according to "FreeBSD Handbook" it is the opposite which is true: An slice is sliced up into partitions.

Thanks,
Manuel
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:48 PM
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Edit: NM it's already fixed. I just tough I remember reading this wrong definition in the handbook but it is correct in the handbook already.

It seams that the terms are used in the wrong way. This is kind of confusing.

manumart1: if I understand right you say and the FreeBSD Handbook say that it is the "primary partions" that are slices and the mount points that PC-BSD calls slices thats are partions.

Last edited by asedt; 02-04-2012 at 12:32 AM.
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Old 02-14-2012, 03:38 PM
paul47 paul47 is offline
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Quote:
Note* my wording of partitions and slices conflicts with what you will read on the installer.
It's bad enough that the official BSD terminology calls "slices" what the dos and linux world calls "partitions". It's even worse that BSD subdivisions of their slices are called "partitions", leading to two conflicting definitions of the word "partition". Now you propose to switch the definitions of both slices and partitions? This is madness. Trust me, it does not help BSD newbies when you keep redefining things.

Also, the fact it is full of obsolete information is no help either.

It's time to unsticky this thread and let it die a natural death.

BTW, if you REALLY want to reduce the confusion, eliminate the word "partition" entirely from the BSD vocabulary and from all programs and documents, replacing it with another word like "section", "segment", "portion", "allotment", "division", or whatever else you can drag out of a thesaurus. Then, you can simply say to newbies, "a BSD slice is exactly the same thing as a dos/windows/linux partition," and they will understand.

Last edited by paul47; 02-14-2012 at 03:52 PM.
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