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Old 05-17-2010, 04:52 PM
chalbersma chalbersma is offline
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Default Eclipse
I've installed Java and Eclipse. But when I try to create a c++ managed project the system acts like it has no Idea what I'm talkin' 'bout. Can someone else try Eclipse on i386 + 8.0 and see if it's just my system or if the package is broken? Thank you.
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Old 05-18-2010, 12:09 AM
bebuxe bebuxe is offline
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Have you set in Eclipse where your C++ compiler is at? I think we use the GCC-G++ compiler. Type in the terminal "g++" or "c++". If one of them say anything, that is your compiler (if gcc, use gcc, if not the c++ compiler). Find in your files, and reference the location to Eclipse (even if it is a symbolic link that you will be using). You also have to set up the gdb.out file (or whatever is called, the debugger).
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Old 05-18-2010, 06:45 AM
chalbersma chalbersma is offline
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Default Both instances work
Code:
$ c++
c++: No input files specified
$ g++
g++: No input files specified
$ c++ -v
Using built-in specs.
Target: i386-undermydesk-freebsd
Configured with: FreeBSD/i386 system compiler
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.2.1 20070719  [FreeBSD]
$ g++ -v
Using built-in specs.
Target: i386-undermydesk-freebsd
Configured with: FreeBSD/i386 system compiler
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.2.1 20070719  [FreeBSD]
If my memory serves c++ is just a symlink to g++. I doubt not having the compiler installed is the issue. Unless eclipse tries to use a new compiler.
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Old 05-18-2010, 11:35 AM
bebuxe bebuxe is offline
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No, eclipse doesn't know of there is a compiler at all. But when you excute something, like a c++ file, it will give that error since it does not know where the compiler is. For every system you must reference the compiler for eclipse and the debuger in the preferences section. I just forgot where in the system files g++ is at in PCBSD. If it was already set, then we move to more diagnosis of the situation.
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Old 11-14-2012, 07:52 PM
Abdul Abdul is offline
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Installed eclipse yesterday.
First impression:
Eclipse is large by itself. PBIs are large by themselves. But 800+ MB? Something's wrong.
First start. I see that it's hugely bloated. Java, Python, Ruby, PHP, XML, a ton of stuff I don't know. But no C and C++, the 1st and 3rd most popular languages last time I checked. I see some sense in adding more by default, but this is hugely inconsequential.
I added a plugin for this and went to remove the preinstalled junk....and Eclipse wouldn't let me. Now that's seriously wrong, all menus are cluttered, application is slow, it doesn't work well at all and I can't fix it? No, if it's going to be like that I view the PBI as useless for anybody who'll spend more time with it, it's better to have a port in a jail.

And now I switched from XFCE to E16, a miracle happened. All extensions are gone. I like it, it saved me some time, but it's a bug.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:15 AM
bebuxe bebuxe is offline
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Talking :ed
@Abdul
Concurred. I am unto vi and gcc these days. I have changed a LOT.
In the future, I plan to play with scheme/guile and pcc.

Thanks to everyone here. I never would had the courage to learn *nix, and its wonders, if it weren't for this distro and your work as a stepladder.

PS
regex!
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YEIH! found the original song from the author herself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAcs5QLT4Ic

Last edited by bebuxe; 11-19-2012 at 11:17 AM.
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Old 11-19-2012, 04:18 PM
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The GCC compiler package is not included in the Eclipse PBI be default in order to (try) to lower the size of the package. The GCC compiler package is already included by default on the base FreeBSD system, so you may need to edit the path preferences to point Eclipse to the proper gcc/g++ binaries (located in /usr/bin/).

Some/most of the size for Eclipse comes from all the Java development/runtime tools, but the additional compilers for ruby/python/perl/etc... definitely do not help any. I think the problem is not with the package itself, but rather that as an application Eclipse is rather bloated and tries to be the solution for every kind of development platform in existence. While this might be good for a workplace environment (where only one program is used for all development on all employee systems), it is not necessarily the best approach for someone who just wants to develop a simple C++ program.
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Old 11-19-2012, 09:12 PM
Abdul Abdul is offline
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Originally Posted by Beanpole View Post
The GCC compiler package is not included in the Eclipse PBI be default in order to (try) to lower the size of the package. The GCC compiler package is already included by default on the base FreeBSD system, so you may need to edit the path preferences to point Eclipse to the proper gcc/g++ binaries (located in /usr/bin/).
The C++ thing is not about compiler but plugin, which enables all C/C++ related features all the way down to syntax highlighting.

Originally Posted by Beanpole View Post
I think the problem is not with the package itself, but rather that as an application Eclipse is rather bloated and tries to be the solution for every kind of development platform in existence.
I disagree. Eclipse tries to be flexible enough to do anything, which makes it kinda bloated, but the packager wanted the standard installation to do anything which is *the* problem.
On the Eclipse site the lightest build of Eclipse 3.7 is 90 MB (fatty already). The probably most popular, Java, version is 128 MB. Some dependencies might be needed, but it's nowhere near 825 MB of PBI.
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Old 11-20-2012, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Abdul View Post
The C++ thing is not about compiler but plugin, which enables all C/C++ related features all the way down to syntax highlighting.
Thanks for the clarification, I just added the C/C++ plugin to the package as well.

Quote:
I disagree. Eclipse tries to be flexible enough to do anything, which makes it kinda bloated, but the packager wanted the standard installation to do anything which is *the* problem.
On the Eclipse site the lightest build of Eclipse 3.7 is 90 MB (fatty already). The probably most popular, Java, version is 128 MB. Some dependencies might be needed, but it's nowhere near 825 MB of PBI.
I see your point. I guess this is just the difference between a binary packaging format (which means that everything needs to be pre-compiled and included in the single package), and a system/source packaging format (where you can compile and add additional packages later).

I suppose this could be relieved by an alternate plugin system for Eclipse, where any plugins are just an additional file in the user's home dir. This means that the main program would not need to have all the plugins actually incorporated into the main program structure in order to work properly (therefore the main package could be very small). Afterwards, you could fetch/install the desired plugins to the user's settings only as necessary. Of course, then you run into the issue of making sure that the plugins themselves have versions already compiled for FreeBSD, but that would be a much smaller problem to solve.
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:49 PM
Abdul Abdul is offline
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Originally Posted by Beanpole View Post
I suppose this could be relieved by an alternate plugin system for Eclipse, where any plugins are just an additional file in the user's home dir. This means that the main program would not need to have all the plugins actually incorporated into the main program structure in order to work properly (therefore the main package could be very small). Afterwards, you could fetch/install the desired plugins to the user's settings only as necessary. Of course, then you run into the issue of making sure that the plugins themselves have versions already compiled for FreeBSD, but that would be a much smaller problem to solve.
This is all Java, so that's how it works except for compilation requirements.
When I needed to add C Development Toolkit, I did it from the official Eclipse site and it just worked. Bundling it in is unnecessary and I'm pretty sure that's how it is with other extensions too.
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